Stories

Spooky Duke Race 2017

Providing Comfort When a Child Dies By: Helen Baldwin In 1997, our two-month old baby, Jeffrey, was diagnosed with spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), a neuromuscular/motor neuron disease and leading genetic killer of children under two. He died 3-1/2 months later, but our assignment was hardly over. Regardless of circumstances, grief is excruciating at best. The only guarantee is its unpredictability and propensity for making one wonder if itʼs possible to escape the abyss of heart-shredding...
Never Give Up!!         Zach was diagnosed with autism with mild mental retardation back in 1989.  He was 3 at the time we received our news.  There was little known about autism or how to treat it.  Our journey started with Zach at the age of 1.  I knew something was wrong but all the doctors did tell me that he was a boy and that boys really do develop later.  But I knew they were wrong.  Day after day we watched him gesture at...
It Takes A Village “It takes a village” is the old saying about raising a child. This can't be more true than when raising a child with special needs. Being able to talk with someone who understands the trials and tribulations can help a parent with both their mental and physical state immensely. But when someone understands the celebrations of goals your child achieves, no matter how small it may seem, it means so much more. Our family found this out first hand when our son was born a little...
Jessie's Story
By: Dayne Alexander When she was very young, Jessie Jackson developed in much the same way as others her age. When she was five years old, Jessie could climb trees and talk with a bit of a stutter. By first grade, she had lost most of her speech. By age nineteen she had lost most of her spoken voice; she could say around one-hundred words. Today, a year later, Jessie can only say the word "mom". She uses a wheelchair to get around and a speaking device to help her communicate with those around...
Ben's Story
By Ben's Family "We'll just have to love him more!" was my five-year-old's response to my explanation of what having Down syndrome would mean for her new baby brother. Lacey has never considered what he couldn't do; only what he could do. If anyone ever mentions a weakness or a lack of a skill, she immediately comes back with "but he can......" She has always been his most dedicated teacher and advocate, helping him learn as much as he can. She even taught him to swim. When he started school,...
protecting your assets
We Thought We had more time! By Julie Davis On July 30, 2010 the reality of procrastination crashed down in my life. My husband, Richard, was killed in a horrible accident at work. He was only 52. Neither one of us knew that Friday morning our kiss and hug goodbye would be our last. We thought we had more time. Despite the overwhelming grief of losing my husband of 25 years and leaving my 3 three children fatherless; the reality of our procrastination was only the beginning of a yearlong...
a family's special story
My husband and I already had a healthy girl who was 4 1/2 years old when we decided to try to have another child. After 3 unsuccessful years of trying to conceive, out of nowhere we got pregnant with our second child. Everything was going just fine with the pregnancy, so we decided to find out what the gender of the baby was through an ultrasound. My doctor was doing the ultrasound and seemed quiet and focused. She asked my husband to go out with my daughter and gave me the news that there were...
Courtney Bell’s Story
By Dayne Alexander Courtney Bell is a first year student at Appalachian State University, and it is clear that she loves being in college. She is very excited to be taking dance class, taking nutrition and hospitality management courses, attending football games, singing in the gospel choir, working on campus in Sanford Commons, and hanging out with all of her new friends. Courtney is very much your typical fun-loving college girl, but she is also the pilot student in ASU's Scholars with...

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